Our Mission

Furniture Share is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that has been in operation since 1998. Our mission is to provide locally grown and locally made healthy foods and redistribute quality used furniture to children, families and individuals in need, thus diverting items from the landfill.

Sustaining client services to target populations through Healthy Food Boxes and Furniture Delivery and Landfill Diversion program will administer delivery of healthy food boxes and redistribution of quality used furniture to individuals and families in need through our BEDS for KIDS, Feeding Our Future​ and​Furniture for Individuals in Crises projects to ensure safety, health, comfort and quality of life to those within Linn, Benton and surrounding Counties.

Feeding Our Future is our newest campaign that brings families together. Many families in our communities do not sit around a dining room table and have family meals. Your gift of $50 will provide a family a dining room table and chairs to share family meals. Studies have shown children who eat meals with their family eat more fruits and vegetables, which can decrease obesity in children. It also brings the family closer so the children are less likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol.

Here at Furniture Share we are taking this one step further for families and supplying them with not only a dining room table and chairs, but with a flyer that lists five 5 ingredient meals for under $50.00 a week, information on how families benefit from family meals, and five meal-time conversation starters. Many parents want to connect with their children but don’t know how, so we are giving them this communication tool that will help them talk and be engaged with their children during meal times.

These conversation starters are open ended questions to get their children talking. Young children who participate in family meals have increased vocabulary and reading skills.

Feeding Our Future annually provides 5,000+​ individuals with healthy food boxes filled with locally grown fruit and vegetables and locally made no preservatives breads and 25​0 tables and chairs to families. We provide recipes with five ingredients or less and conversation starter tips for families to eat together resulting in wholesome meals, improved family conversations, achievement at school or work and greater family stability. Research data supports the fact that families that eat together have improved nutritional decisions (less obesity), vocabulary and grades in school, and family behavior resulting in less violence.

Teens who often eat dinner with family less likely to drink, smoke or use drugs

Did you Know Furniture Share has a Feeding Our Future program that provides families with dinner tables and conversation starters. The American Public Health Association published the following report:

Amid the vast array of scientific literature on reducing teens’ risk for substance use, a new report offers a method as pure and simple as pulling up chairs around the family dinner table.

Teens whose families eat dinner together at least five times per week are less likely to smoke, drink and use drugs, according to a recent report from the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. But teens whose families gather around the dinner table fewer than three times per week are almost four times more likely to smoke, more than twice as likely to use alcohol and two and a half times more likely to use marijuana.

Even worse, teens whose families infrequently come together for dinner are nearly four times more likely to say they can see themselves trying drugs in the future, according to the report. Published in September, the report is the seventh in a multi-year series on the importance of family dinners from the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

“This year’s study again demonstrates that the magic that happens at family dinners isn’t the food on the table, but the conversations and family engagement around the table,” said Joseph Califano Jr., founder and chairman of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. “When asked about the best part of family dinners, the most frequent answer from teens is the sharing, talking and interacting with family members. The second most frequent answer is sitting down or being together.”

According to the report, teens who eat few dinners with their families each week are more likely to say they have ready access to alcohol, prescription drugs or marijuana. But teens whose families gather regularly for the evening meal are more likely to report having no access to such drugs.

More than half — or 58 percent — of teens surveyed reported having dinner with their families at least five times a week, according to “The Importance of Family Dinners VII.” The number of U.S. teens who share frequent dinners with their families has remained consistent over the past decade, according to the report, which also found that teens who have frequent family dinners are more likely to report having excellent relationships with their parents and siblings.

The report found that teens who infrequently break bread with their families are also more likely to have parents who fail to take the time to check in with their children on a regular basis.

“Parental engagement in children’s lives is key to raising healthy, drug-free kids, and one of the simplest acts of parental engagement is sitting down to the family dinner,” Califano said. “Seventeen years of surveying teens has taught us that the more often children have dinner with their families the less likely they are to smoke, drink or use drugs.”

“Beds for Kids” is a wonderful campaign serving children of Linn, Benton, and surrounding counties. Studies have shown that children who get a good night’s sleep in a bed of their own do better in school physically and mentally. In order for us to help these children get a night’s sleep, we are asking for your help. With your help of a $40 donation, together we can provide a child in need with their own bed, pillow, sheets, and a blanket.

The substantial benefits of our BEDS for KIDS project are that children no longer have to sleep on the floor in our communities, which improves their sleep and performance in school and improves safety, health, comfort, warmth, and quality of life for children. Our Feeding Our Future project provides individuals with healthy food boxes filled with locally grown fruit and vegetables and locally made no preservatives breads & families with a dining table and chairs, recipes with five ingredients or less, and conversation starter tips. The benefits of this project are improved family conversation and achievement at school or work, wholesome meals, and family stability. Furniture for Individuals in Crises increases comfort and safety in homes, increases wellness, independence, physical and mental health by providing individuals in need with the basic furniture and household items to improve their quality of life.

BEDS for KIDS ​annually ​provides 1,800​+​ children with a bed, pillow, sheets and blanket who are in emergency or vulnerable situations who sleep on cold floors, in street clothes and in conditions that increase sickness, deprives sleep and contributes to poor performance in schools.
Importance of Sleep to help Break the Cycle of Poverty

Sleep is one of the most important activities we do to boost the quality of all aspects of our lives. However, for the thousands of children living in poverty within our community, who are sleeping without a bed, getting the proper amount of sleep is just not an option. Without enough sleep, these school-aged children experiencing poverty are put at a serious disadvantage and are unable to learn at their full potential. By giving them the ability to get a good night’s sleep they will be one step closer to completing their education and breaking the cycle of poverty.  Studies have shown that one of the best ways to break the cycle of poverty is through education and the completion of high school. As well, inadequate sleep when combined with other stress factors, like poverty, can cause higher levels of behavioral problems and put these children at even more of a disadvantage. We need to give school-aged children as many tools as possible to complete and succeed in their education. One of these tools is a bed.

Sleep plays a vital role in good health and well-being throughout your life. Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety. The way you feel while you’re awake depends in part on what happens while you’re sleeping. During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health. In children and teens, sleep also helps support growth and development. The damage from sleep deficiency can occur in an instant (such as a car crash), or it can harm you over time. For example, ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems. It also can affect how well you think, react, work, learn, and get along with others. Sleep helps your brain work properly. While you’re sleeping, your brain is preparing for the next day. It’s forming new pathways to help you learn and remember information.

Children and teens who are sleep deficient may have problems getting along with others. They may feel angry and impulsive, have mood swings, feel sad or depressed, or lack motivation. They also may have problems paying attention, and they may get lower grades and feel stressed. The average kid has a busy day. There’s school, taking care of their pets, running around with friends, going to sports practice or other activities, and doing their homework. By the end of the day, their body needs a break. Sleep allows their body to rest for the next day. Their body and their brain need sleep. Most kids between 5 and 12 get about 9.5 hours a night, but experts agree that most need 10 or 11 hours each night. Sleep is an individual thing and some kids need more than others. When your body doesn’t have enough hours to rest, you may feel tired or cranky, or you may be unable to think clearly. You might have a hard time following directions, or you might have an argument with a friend over something petty. A school assignment that’s normally easy may feel impossible, or feel clumsy playing your favorite sport or instrument. One more reason to get enough sleep: If you don’t, you may not grow as well. That’s right, researchers believe too little sleep can affect growth and your immune system— which keeps you from getting sick. Here are some facts about the importance of sleep as well as information about the effects of poverty on children and their education:

  • 1 in every 7 children in Oregon is living in poverty
  • 45% of children in America are living in low-income families
  • Every 9 seconds during the school year, a public high school student drops out of school
  • Children under age 12 need at least 10 hours of sleep a night
  • Sleep deprivation can lead to obesity, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases
  • Children suffering from sleep deprivation tend to be more hyperactive and experience ADHD-like symptoms

Education has been shown to be the best way to break the cycle of poverty. Getting a good night’s sleep is necessary for a child to perform well at school and give them the tools to succeed!

Physical Health

Sleep plays an important role in your physical health. For example, sleep is involved in healing and repair of your heart and blood vessels. Ongoing sleep deficiency is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke.

Sleep deficiency also increases the risk of obesity. For example, one study of teenagers showed that with each hour of sleep lost, the odds of becoming obese went up. Sleep deficiency increases the risk of obesity in other age groups as well.

Sleep helps maintain a healthy balance of the hormones that make you feel hungry (ghrelin) or full (leptin). When you don’t get enough sleep, your level of ghrelin goes up and your level of leptin goes down. This makes you feel hungrier than when you’re well-rested.

Sleep also affects how your body reacts to insulin, the hormone that controls your blood glucose (sugar) level. Sleep deficiency results in a higher than normal blood sugar level, which may increase your risk for diabetes.

Sleep also supports healthy growth and development. Deep sleep triggers the body to release the hormone that promotes normal growth in children and teens. This hormone also boosts muscle mass and helps repair cells and tissues in children, teens, and adults. Sleep also plays a role in puberty and fertility.

Your immune system relies on sleep to stay healthy. This system defends your body against foreign or harmful substances. Ongoing sleep deficiency can change the way in which your immune system responds. For example, if you’re sleep deficient, you may have trouble fighting common infections.

Daytime Performance and Safety

Getting enough quality sleep at the right times helps you function well throughout the day. People who are sleep deficient are less productive at work and school. They take longer to finish tasks, have a slower reaction time, and make more mistakes.

After several nights of losing sleep—even a loss of just 1–2 hours per night—your ability to function suffers as if you haven’t slept at all for a day or two. Lack of sleep also may lead to microsleep. Microsleep refers to brief moments of sleep that occur when you’re normally awake. You can’t control microsleep, and you might not be aware of it. For example, have you ever driven somewhere and then not remembered part of the trip? If so, you may have experienced microsleep.

Even if you’re not driving, microsleep can affect how you function. If you’re listening to a lecture, for example, you might miss some of the information or feel like you don’t understand the point. In reality, though, you may have slept through part of the lecture and not been aware of it.

The substantial benefits of our BEDS for KIDS project are that children no longer have to sleep on the floor in our communities, which improves their sleep and performance in school and improves safety, health, comfort, warmth, and quality of life for children. Our Feeding Our Future project provides individuals with healthy food boxes filled with locally grown fruit and vegetables and locally made no preservatives breads & families with a dining table and chairs, recipes with five ingredients or less, and conversation starter tips. The benefits of this project are improved family conversation and achievement at school or work, wholesome meals, and family stability. Furniture for Individuals in Crises increases comfort and safety in homes, increases wellness, independence, physical and mental health by providing individuals in need with the basic furniture and household items to improve their quality of life.

In FY 15/16 Furniture Share distributed 11,156 quality used furniture items to 5,052 individuals of which 2,903 where children and 1,865 of those children received a bed and diverted 369.35 tons from the landfill.